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Irish Episcopal Watch

 

SSPX/ Resistance  Watch

 

Aspirations

to be said throughout the day

Jesus! (300 days indulgence)

 

Hail, O Holy Cross, our only hope. (500 days indulgence)

 

Jesus, Mary and Joseph, I offer you my heart and my soul. 

Jesus, Mary and Joseph, assist me in my last agony.

Jesus, Mary and Joseph, may I breathe forth my soul with you in peace. (300 days altogether, 100 day each; Pius VII, 1807)

 

Eternal Father! I offer Thee the Precious Blood of Jesus, in satisfaction for my sins, and for the wants of Holy Church. (100 days; Pius VII, 1817)

 

Sweet Heart of Mary, be my salvation. (300 days when said with contrition and devotion; Pius IX, 1852)

 

May the most just, most high, most adorable Will of God be in all things done, and praised, and magnified for ever. (100 days once a day; Pope Pius VII, 1815)

Our Lady of the Rosary, pray for us. (300 days)

 

My God and my All.

 

Heart of Jesus, all for Thee.

 

Set thyself, O faithful Virgin, as a seal upon my heart, that in thee and through thee I may be found faithful to God.

 

O Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place all my trust in Thee. (300 days)

 

Jesus, Mary and Joseph, I love you, save souls.

 

Prayer to St. Joseph: Remember, most pure husband of Mary ever-Virgin, my loving protector Joseph, that never hath it been heard that any one invoked thy protection or asked aid of thee who has not been consoled. In this confidence, I come before thee, I fervently recommend myself to thee. Despise not my prayer, reputed father of the Saviour of men, but do thou in thy pity receive it. (300 days)

The Sacraments of Desire

Denzinger

 

Confession of Desire

 

807 Those who by sin have fallen away from the received grace of justification, will again be able to be justified [can. 29] when, roused by God through the sacrament of penance, they by the merit of Christ shall have attended to the recovery of the grace lost. For this manner of justification is the reparation of one fallen, which the holy Fathers * have aptly called a second plank after the shipwreck of lost grace. For on behalf of those who after baptism fall into sin, Christ Jesus instituted the sacrament of penance, when He said: "Receive ye the Holy Ghost; whose sins you shall forgive, they are forgiven them, and whose sins you shall retain, they are retained" [John 20:22, 23]. Hence it must be taught that the repentance of a Christian after his fall is very different from that at his baptism, and that it includes not only a cessation from sins, and a detestation of them, or "a contrite and humble heart" [Ps. 50:19], but also the sacramental confession of the same, at least in desire and to be made in its season, and sacerdotal absolution, as well as satisfaction by fasting, almsgiving, prayers, and other devout exercises of the spiritual life, not indeed for the eternal punishment, which is remitted together with the guilt either by the sacrament or the desire of the sacrament, but for the temporal punishment [can. 30], which (as the Sacred Writings teach) is not always wholly remitted, as is done in baptism, to those who ungrateful to the grace of God which they have received, "have grieved the Holy Spirit" [cf. Eph. 4:30], and have not feared to "violate the temple of God" [1 Cor. 3:17]. Of this repentance it is written: "Be mindful, whence thou art fallen, do penance, and do the first works" [Rev. 2:5], and again: "The sorrow which is according to God, worketh penance steadfast unto salvation" [2 Cor. 7:10], and again: "Do penance" [Matt. 3:2; 4:17], and, "Bring forth fruits worthy of penance" [Matt. 3:8].